Abstract

The baby boom was an accident, a coincidence of events. Seventeen million more people were born between 1946 and 1964 than would have been born if the young American women of the postwar years had followed the traditions of their mothers. Without the extra births, those born between 1946 and 1964 would have grown up inconspicuously. Instead, the huge generation—now one-third of all Americans—changed the United States as much as any war, depression, president, or invention. For decades social scientists have been trying to explain why the baby boom happened. They might as well try to explain the hoola hoop—the baby boom was a freak storm of life, a baby fad sparked by the euphoria of victory in World War II.

Keywords

Depression Income Nash Cola 

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Cheryl Russell 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cheryl Russell

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