Working with people from ethnic groups

  • Kathleen Maczka
Part of the Therapy in Practice Series book series (TPS)

Abstract

When the term ‘ethnic group’ or ‘ethnic minority’ is used in Britain, there is a tendency to apply it only to the Asian or black populations. There is also a tendency to apply very generalized information rigidly and assume that all ethnic groups behave in a similar manner and experience similar problems.

Keywords

Arthritis 

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References and Further Reading

  1. Barnett, V. (1980) A Jewish Family in Britain. Pergamon Press.Google Scholar
  2. Bridger, P. (1980) A Hindu Family in Britain. Pergamon Press.Google Scholar
  3. Community Relations Commission. (1976) Between Two Cultures. Commission for Racial Equality, London.Google Scholar
  4. Harrison, S. (1980) A Muslim Family in Britain. Pergamon Press.Google Scholar
  5. Health and Social Service Journal (15.7.82). Asians in hospital — What’s in a name?Google Scholar
  6. Kings Fund Centre. (1982) Ethnic Minorities and Health Care in London. King’s Fund Publications, London.Google Scholar
  7. Levine, R. (ed.) (1984) The cultural aspects of home care delivery. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 38 (11), 734–8.Google Scholar
  8. Lobo, E.H. (1978) Children of Immigrants in Britain — Their Health and Social Problems. Hodder and Stoughton, Sevenoaks.Google Scholar
  9. Owen, C.W. (1980) A Sikh Family in Britain. Pergamon Press.Google Scholar
  10. Wilson, A. (1978) Finding a Voice — Asian Women in Britain. Virago, London.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kathleen Maczka 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kathleen Maczka
    • 1
  1. 1.Occupational Therapist and Day Hospital ManagerBethnal Green HospitalLondonUK

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