Science Fiction and Fantasy Writing

  • Thomas B. Ward
  • Ronald A. Finke
  • Steven M. Smith

Abstract

Stephen Donaldson, the noted science fiction and fantasy author, had a vexing problem, the sort of problem that most writers dread. He had an idea that he wanted to write about, but could not find a suitable way to convey it. He wanted to probe the abstract concept of “unbelief,” an unwillingness to accept the possibility that fantasy worlds might exist. But, try as he might, he could not discern the story line, the vehicle that could transport this vague idea from mind to paper.

Keywords

Migraine Germinal Arena Alan Leprosy 

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Notes

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    If the puddle of muck grew larger, engulfed its surroundings, and became a threat to humans, as in the case of “The Blob,” an absorbing tale might result. However, readers of science fiction have become more sophisticated over the years, and most would now want a convincing account of the creatures’ means of survival, and so forth.Google Scholar
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    Bob Shaw, How to Write Science Fiction ( London: Allison & Busby, 1993 ).Google Scholar
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    Card, in How to Write Science Fiction and Fantasy.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Thomas B. Ward, Ronald A. Finke, and Steven M. Smith 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas B. Ward
  • Ronald A. Finke
  • Steven M. Smith

There are no affiliations available

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