Early Intervention in Third World Countries

  • Robert Serpell
  • Dabie Nabuzoka
Part of the Rehabilitation Education book series (RE)

Abstract

Several important theoretical advantages can be cited for timing interventions on behalf of disabled and at-risk children as early as possible. Primary prevention implies intervention prior to onset of a condition. In addition, recent technological advances have made possible the secondary prevention of certain functional disabilities which without intervention would necessarily follow from a given organic impairment. Conspicuous examples of such advances are the prevention of intellectual disabilities by dietary correction of phenyl ketonuria or by cerebral spinal fluid shunting in cases of hydrocephaly and the supply of hearing aids (and FM transmitter microphones for the caregiver) to enable deaf children to develop speech. Behavioural techniques including physio­therapeutic exercises and conditioning procedures have also been shown to be highly efficacious with very young children. The human brain displays its greatest plasticity early in life, and any process of adaptation is likely to be cumulative so that an early start in the right direction is surely advantageous.

Keywords

Europe Transportation Phenyl Stratification Nigeria 

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Copyright information

© David Mitchell and Roy I. Brown 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert Serpell
  • Dabie Nabuzoka

There are no affiliations available

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