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The Mass Media in Health Promotion

  • Keith Tones
  • Sylvia Tilford
  • Yvonne Keeley Robinson

Abstract

In this chapter, the mass media are viewed in the same strategic way as, for instance, community development, patient education or the schools. Just as the schools have particular characteristics and may thus make a qualitatively different impact from, say, informal education in the community, mass media have their peculiar strengths and weaknesses. Ideally they would be used as part of a comprehensive programme which employs the range of strategies and agencies described earlier in this book. All too frequently they have been used in far from splendid isolation — either because the prospect of a fully co-ordinated programme has been too daunting, or more likely because they have been assumed to possess a power akin to that of a kind of educational ‘magic bullet’. The view expressed at the head of this page is not unique to Dr Goebbels!

Keywords

Health Promotion Smoking Cessation Health Education Mass Medium Social Marketing 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Tones, Tilford and Robinson 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keith Tones
  • Sylvia Tilford
  • Yvonne Keeley Robinson

There are no affiliations available

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