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Professional Development of Nursing Practice

  • Dianne M. Danis

Abstract

The professional development of emergency nursing is occurring rapidly. This chapter attempts to explain how that development is advanced and applied where it really matters — in the Emergency Department (ED). In order for patients to benefit, theories and trends must be translated into nursing care systems and programmes. The person who can make this happen is the ED nurse manager, whether called nurse manager, head nurse, chief nurse, or assistant director of nursing. The role of the nurse manager reflects the synthesis of conceptualization and implementation.

Keywords

Professional Development Nursing Staff Nurse Manager Clinical Nurse Specialist Advance Cardiac Life SUpport 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Further Reading

  1. Doyle, C., Pool, H., Burrey, R.E. et al. (1987) Family participation during resuscitation: An option. Annals of Emergency Medicine, 16, 6.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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  3. Nichol, K.A. (1984) Psychological Care in Physical Illness. Croom Helm, London.Google Scholar
  4. Stratton, H. (1981) Keeping the patient in touch with reality. Care of the Critically Ill, 3, 1.Google Scholar
  5. Trunkey, D.D. (1983) Trauma. Scientific American, 20, 7.Google Scholar
  6. Wright, S. (1985) New nurses: new boundaries. Nursing Practice, 1, 1Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Bob Wright 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dianne M. Danis

There are no affiliations available

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