Microbiological control of food production

  • T. A. Roberts

Abstract

Throughout the ages man has tried to control food-borne diseases and spoilage by, for example, learning not to eat some foods that had putrefied because they were sometimes toxic, and by evolving ways of preserving foods in an edible condition. Empirical knowledge of food preservation processes is centuries old, and most processes used today to preserve foods were developed as a result of experience. For example, in ancient Egypt, cattle were domesticated predominantly to provide milk, which was converted into cheese following a schedule similar to a modern code of practice. Pork was cured, fish were cooked and eaten or stored salted or dried. Some 2000 years BC several different types of breads were baked, beer was brewed and several different wines made. Plants such as lettuce, cucumber, beans and cabbage were cultivated, while onions, leek and garlic were popular. Preserved foods were stored from times of plenty to times of scarcity. It is only within the last two hundred years, however, that we have come to understand that many of the processes which cause deterioration of plant and animal tissues involve micro-organisms.

Keywords

Fermentation Sodium Chloride Tuberculosis Nitrite Aspergillus 

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References

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Copyright information

© Adrian R. Eley 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. A. Roberts

There are no affiliations available

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