Difficult decisions in prenatal diagnosis

  • Christine Garrett
  • Lyn Carlton

Abstract

Decisions in prenatal diagnosis are difficult when the diagnosis is clear. How much more difficult it is when there is only a risk of abnormality, or where the effects of the abnormality cannot be predicted. This chapter will explore some of these situations, the ways in which couples come to a decision and the role of the counsellor in helping them to decide.

Keywords

Depression Testosterone Dition Infertility Transsexualism 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christine Garrett
  • Lyn Carlton

There are no affiliations available

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