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Basic nutrients

  • Martin Eastwood

Keywords

Linoleic Acid Bile Acid Dietary Fibre Essential Amino Acid Starch Granule 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Further reading

  1. Solomons, T.W.G. (1992) Organic Chemistry, 5th edn, John Wiley & Sons, New York.Google Scholar
  2. Carpenter, K.J. (1994) Protein and Energy, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.Google Scholar
  3. Creighton, T.E. (1984) Protein Structures and Molecular Principles. W.H. Freeman & Co., New York.Google Scholar
  4. Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization/United Nations (1985) Energy and Protein Requirements. Technical Report Series, no. 724. WHO, Geneva.Google Scholar
  5. Monod, J., Changeux, J.P. and Jacob, F. (1963) Allosteric proteins and molecular control systems. Journal of Molecular Biology, 6, 306–29.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Perutz, M. (1990) Mechanisms of Cooperativity and Allosteric Regulation, Oxford University Press, Oxford.Google Scholar
  7. Reeds, P.J. (1990) Amino acid needs and protein storing patterns. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, 49, 489–97.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Zubay, G. (1993) Biochemistry, 3rd edn, Wm Brown, Iowa, USA.Google Scholar
  9. Creighton, T.E. (1984) Protein Structures and Molecular Principles, W.H. Freeman & Co., New York.Google Scholar
  10. Dean, P.M. (ed.) (1995) Molecular Similarity in Drug Design, Blackie Academic and Professional, London.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Doolittle, R.F. (1995) The multiplicity of domains in proteins. Annual Review of Biochemistry, 64, 287–314.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization/United Nations (1985) Energy and Protein Requirements. Technical Report Series, no. 724, WHO, Geneva.Google Scholar
  13. Monod, J., Changeux, J.P. and Jacob, F. (1963) Allosteric proteins and molecular control systems. journal of Molecular Biology, 6, 306–29.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Perutz, M. (1990) Mechanisms of Cooperativity and Allosteric Regulation, Oxford University Press, Oxford.Google Scholar
  15. Reeds, P.J. (1990) Amino acid needs and protein storing patterns. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, 49, 489–97.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Zubay, G. (1991) Biochemistry, 3rd edn, W.C. Brown, Iowa, USA.Google Scholar
  17. Gurr, M.I. and Harwood, J.L. (1991) Lipids, Chapman & Hall, London.Google Scholar
  18. Shoppee, C.W. (1964) Chemistry of the Steroids, Butterworths, London.Google Scholar
  19. Trans Fatty Acids (1987) Report of the British Nutrition Foundation, London.Google Scholar
  20. Willett, W.C., Stampfer, M.J., Manson, J.E., Colditz, G.A., Speizer, F.E., Rosner, B.A., Sampson, L.A. and Hennekens, C.H. (1993) Intake of trans fatty acids and risk of coronary heart disease among women. Lancet, 341, 581–5.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Dobbing, J. (ed.) (1989) Dietary Starches and Sugars in Man: A Comparison, ILSI Human Nutrition Reviews, Springer-Ver lag, London.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Eriksson, C. (ed.) (1981) Maillard Reaction in Food. Pergamon Press, Sweden.Google Scholar
  23. Report of the British Nutrition Foundation’s Task Force (1987) Sugars and Syrups. British Nutrition Foundation, London.Google Scholar
  24. Zubay, G. (1993) Biochemistry, 3rd edn, Wm C. Brown Publishers, Dubuque, Iowa, USA.Google Scholar
  25. Annison, G. and Topping, D.L. (1994) Nutritional role of resistant starch. Annual Review of Nutrition, 14, 297–320.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Atwell, W.A., Hood, L.F., Lineback, D.R., Varriano-Marstoatone, and Zobell, H.F. (1988) The terminology and methodology associated with basic starch phenomena. Cereal Food World, 33, 306–11.Google Scholar
  27. Dobbing, J. (ed.) (1989) Dietary Starches and Sugars in Man: A Comparison, ILSI Human Nutrition Reviews, Springer-Verlag, London.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Englyst, H.N. and Cummings, J.H. (1986) Digestion of polysaccharides of potato in the small intestine of man. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 45, 423–31.Google Scholar
  29. Englyst, H.N. and Kingman, S.M. (1990) Dietary fiber and resistant starch, a nutritional classification of plant polysaccharides, in Dietary Fiber (eds D. Kritchevsky, C. Bonfield and J.W. Anderson), Plenum Press, New York.Google Scholar
  30. Report of the British Nutrition Foundation Task Force (1990) Complex carbohydrates in Foods, Chapman & Hall, London.Google Scholar
  31. Southgate, D.A.T. (1976) Determination of Food Carbohydrates, Applied Sciences Publishers, London.Google Scholar
  32. Hellendoorn, E.W. (1978) Fermentation as the principal cause of the physiological activity of indigestible food residue, in Topics in Dietary Fiber Research (ed. G.A. Speller), Plenum Press, New York, pp. 127–216.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Kritchevsky, D. and Bonfield, C. (1994) Dietary Fibre in Health and Disease, Eagan Press, St Paul Minnesota, USA.Google Scholar
  34. Kritchevsky, D., Bonfield, C. and Anderson, J.W. (eds) (1990) Dietary Fiber, Plenum Press, New York.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Report of the British Nutrition Foundations Task Force (1990) Complex Carbohydrates in Foods, Chapman & Hall, London.Google Scholar
  36. Schweitzer, T.F. and Edwards, CA. (eds) (1992) Dietary Fibre — a Component of Food, Springer-Verlag, London.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Southgate, D.A.T. (1976) Determination of Food Carbohydrates, Applied Sciences Publishers, London.Google Scholar
  38. Trowell, H., Burkitt, D. and Heaton, K. (1985) Dietary Fibre, Fibre-Depleted Foods and Disease, Academic Press, London.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Martin Eastwood 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin Eastwood
    • 1
  1. 1.Western General HospitalUniversity of EdinburghEdinburghUK

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