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Evaluating the results of maternity care: statistical instruments

  • Marjorie Tew

Abstract

In the 20th century in all countries, medical and social resources have increasingly been devoted to providing a maternity service which is intended to make the birth safer for mother and child. But there has never been a concomitant allocation of statistical resources to measure to what extent the service provided, as a whole or in its constituent parts, has achieved its intended objective. Such evaluation as is available has had to be done by indirect methods. It is fragmentary but the pieces can be fitted together to indicate a consistent and convincing picture.

Keywords

Maternal Death Maternity Care Perinatal Mortality Prediction Score Home Birth 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Marjorie Tew 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marjorie Tew
    • 1
  1. 1.Nottingham University Medical SchoolUK

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