Helping students to become independent learners and professionals

  • Jackie Stengelhofen
Part of the Therapy in Practice Series book series (TPS)

Abstract

When a supportive teacher-student relationship is set up, in which the student is helped towards becoming a self-motivated, self-directed learner, then the ground is ready for the use of a number of teaching methods and the provision of opportunities which will promote the student’s learning. Previous models of clinical supervision presumed that students learnt through a process of absorption. Good, well-targetted teaching procedures should be used in clinic to ensure that the student’s time is productive, and that valuable staff resources are used efficiently and effectively. It is better to have less time in clinic, with good teaching, than a longer time not used purposefully.

Keywords

Corn Odour Shoe Aphasia Hemiplegia 

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References

  1. Crago, M.B. and Pickering, M. (1987) Supervision in Human Communication Disorders, College Hill Press, Boston.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Jackie Stengelhofen 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jackie Stengelhofen

There are no affiliations available

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