Key issues for the future

  • Phillip J. Vaughan
  • Douglas Badger
Part of the Therapy in Practice Series book series (TPS)

Abstract

Mentally disordered offenders, along with the general psychiatric population, have become both beneficiaries and victims of the government’s community care policies. They are beneficiaries to the extent that long-term institutional care, along with its accompanying disadvantages, is increasingly being avoided. They are victims to the extent that community facilities, and in some instances community acceptance, has yet to ‘catch up’ with the reforms.

Keywords

Schizophrenia 

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Copyright information

© Phillip J. Vaughan and Douglas Badger 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Phillip J. Vaughan
    • 1
  • Douglas Badger
    • 2
  1. 1.Park Prewett HospitalBasingstokeUK
  2. 2.University of ReadingReadingUK

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