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Careers and Caring: Can Men Manage Both?

  • Lucia A. Gilbert

Abstract

Men’s and women’s lives are inextricably linked. What affects women affects men, and vice versa. The women’s movement in the United States has been inspiring and empowering women for nearly 25 years. Women now experience greater economic freedom and personal opportunity than ever before. Traditional male-dominated professions such as law, medicine, and business report substantial proportions of women. The professional labor force, which was 26% female in 1960, claims 39% women in its ranks today. The majority of these women have husbands and most have children.

Keywords

Provider Role Woman Power Male Dependency Egalitarian Relation Traditional Male Role 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Note

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Copyright information

© Lucia A. Gilbert 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lucia A. Gilbert

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