Nuclear War

I. The Terrible Swift Sword
  • John Jagger

Abstract

The world has never had a nuclear war. Therefore, we do not know exactly what would happen. But if the major powers engaged in a nuclear war, it probably would be the last for at least a thousand years, because human civilization would be destroyed. Preventing nuclear war is the most important issue facing humankind today. On the road toward prevention, we must first do our best to estimate what would happen in a nuclear war.

Keywords

Burning Fatigue Furnace Europe Explosive 

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Copyright information

© John Jagger 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Jagger

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