Lipoprotein Metabolism in Primary Gout - Influence of Alcohol Intake and Body Weight

  • Sumio Takahashi
  • Tetsuya Yamamoto
  • Yuji Moriwaki
  • Michio Suda
  • Oluyemi E. Agbedana
  • Toshikazu Hada
  • Kazuya Higashino
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 309A)

Abstract

It has been reported that a raised serum uric acid is related to the development of atherosclerosis, but the direct association between hyperuricemia and atherosclerosis remains uncertain1). Therefore, in gout it seems important to investigate serum lipids which are among the known risk factors for atherosclerosis. In previous studies, some investigators suggested that hyperlipidemia in primary gout was secondary to excessive alcohol intake2) and/or obesity3), while others suggested that hyperlipidemia was a consequence of essential factors in primary gout4).

Keywords

Cholesterol Obesity Ethylene Glycol Fractionation Triglyceride 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sumio Takahashi
    • 1
  • Tetsuya Yamamoto
    • 1
  • Yuji Moriwaki
    • 1
  • Michio Suda
    • 1
  • Oluyemi E. Agbedana
    • 1
  • Toshikazu Hada
    • 1
  • Kazuya Higashino
    • 1
  1. 1.Third Department of Internal MedicineHyogo College of MedicineNishinomiya, Hyogo 663Japan

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