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Mental Imagery pp 101-112 | Cite as

Deep Trance Subjects: A Schema of Two Distinct Subgroups

  • Deirdre Barrett

Abstract

This chapter will review previous research on characteristics of deep trance subjects with special attention to the trait of fantasy proneness. Then a study will be presented which distinguishes two types of deep trance subjects. One fits the characterization of fantasy proneness and the other is distinguished by dissociative phenomena.

Keywords

Sexual Fantasy Early Memory Hypnotic Susceptibility Dissociative Phenomenon Hypnotic Induction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Deirdre Barrett
    • 1
  1. 1.Behavioral Medicine UnitHarvard Medical SchoolCambridgeUSA

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