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Hypnotic Susceptibility, Imaging Ability, and Information Processing: An Integrative Look

  • Benjamin Wallace

Abstract

At the beginning of the 19th century, Jose Custodi di Faria advocated a psychological explanation of what was then known as mesmerism. He stressed that so-called lucid sleep was taking place during this manipulation and that this was produced solely by the subject’s heightened expectations and receptive attitudes. Since the subject wanted to be mesmerized and expected something to happen as a result, the expectations were in fact realized. With the emphasis on psychological factors during the mesmeric process, Faria developed what might be called a standard procedure for inducing lucid sleep. He used a series of soothing and commanding verbal suggestions while the subject was in the receptive mesmeric state. Faria then realized, as did others to follow such as Ambroise August Liebeault and Hippolyte Marie Bernheim, that verbal suggestion played a major role in mesmerism (Wallace and Fisher, 1987).

Keywords

Ponzo Illusion Ultradian Rhythm Vivid Imager Embed Object Imaging Ability 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benjamin Wallace
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyCleveland State UniversityClevelandUSA

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