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Applications of Soil Conditioners for Agriculture and Engineering

  • D. Gabriels
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSB, volume 214)

Abstract

When the term soil conditioning is used to indicate effects on soil structure, it can refer to practices used both in agriculture and in civil engineering. Soil conditioning in agriculture implies the formation and the stabilisation of aggregates which allow appropriate aeration and draining in the root zone, and hence can give rise to improved crop yields. Soil conditioning in civil engineering terms refers to processes such as the stabilisation of soil embankments against erosion by wind and by water, to dust control, to the fixation of sand dunes, and to a variety of applications in the construction industry.

Keywords

Sugar Beet Sand Dune Soil Aggregate Polyvinyl Acetate Crust Soil 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Gabriels
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.National Fund for Scientific ResearchBrusselsGermany
  2. 2.Department of Soil Physics, Faculty of AgricultureState University of GhentGentBelgium

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