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Family Therapy

A Context for Child Psychiatry
  • Vincenzo F. DiNicola

Abstract

Family therapist is not a euphonious term; Janet Malcolm (1978) complained that it sounded like a job description for a funeral home director. It does not have an authoritative sound; neither does it conjure up the impressive academic and research aura associated with such cognate disciplines as clinical psychology and psychiatry. Indeed, practitioners of this approach are always redefining themselves as structural or strategic therapists, systemic consultants, and constructivists, to name a few aliases. What this indicates is a tension in the field about what is central to the activity of family therapy: Is it united by a broad concern with the family (in all its social, cultural, and historical dimensions, and its clinical and developmental aspects) or divided by competing methods of therapy (with their diverse interviewing techniques and interventions, and their disparate views of the nature of the family, of change, and of therapy)?

Keywords

Anorexia Nervosa Family Therapy Family Conflict Family Therapist Child Psychiatry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vincenzo F. DiNicola
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of Child and Adolescent PsychiatryUniversity of OttawaOttawaCanada
  2. 2.Family Psychiatry Service and Adolescent Day Care ProgramRoyal Ottawa HospitalOttawaCanada

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