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Natural Medicines are Natural Pesticides?

  • J. A. Duke
Chapter

Abstract

I did not believe Bruce Ames (1983) when he said we consumed 10,000 times more natural pesticides than synthetic pesticide residues, so I set out trying to disprove him. But then I learned that tannins were viricidal and essential oils were antiseptic and that tannins and essential oils may constitute up to 10% of the dry weight of such culinary herbs as Oregano (Duke, 1992c) meaning that many herbs and spices contain 100,000 parts per million (ppm) natural pesticides or biocides. Spices from Allium (chives, garlic, leek, onion, etc.) to Zingiber (ginger) are well-endowed with phytochemicals which have proven medicinal and pesticidal properties.

Keywords

Rosmarinic Acid Methyl Salicylate Insect Repellent Anacardic Acid Linalyl Acetate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. A. Duke
    • 1
  1. 1.B-001, R-133 ARS, USDABeltsvilleUSA

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