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The Role of Surface and Gas Phase Reactions in Atomic Layer Epitaxy

  • P. Daniel Dapkus
  • Steve P. DenBaars
  • Qisheng Chen
  • B. Y. Maa
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSB, volume 198)

Abstract

Atomic layer epitaxy is a relatively new variation of conventional MOCVD in which the growth of III–V semiconductors takes place by alternately exposing the substrate to reactant precursors containing the elements of the compound(Pessa et. al., 1980; Pessa et. al., 1983; Nishizawa et. al, 1985; Tischler and Bedair, 1986). Under the appropriate growth conditions, saturated surface reactions can be made to dominate the growth so that one monolayer of the compound is formed per exposure cycle. Although this process is often carried out in a vacuum environment where only surface reactions are important, the highest quality materials have been obtained when carried out in near atmospheric pressure conditions. Under these circumstances it is more difficult to predict the relative roles of surface and gas phase reactions in the overall growth process. We have been involved in a group of studies that are directed toward understanding the roles of these processes in the ALE growth of GaAs. This paper will describe these studies and our current understanding of the near atmospheric pressure ALE growth of GaAs.

Keywords

Atomic Layer Epitaxy Single Quantum Well Saturated Growth Exposure Cycle Layer Thickness Measurement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Daniel Dapkus
    • 1
  • Steve P. DenBaars
    • 1
  • Qisheng Chen
    • 1
  • B. Y. Maa
    • 1
  1. 1.Depatments of Electrical Engineering and Materials ScienceUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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