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Outdoor and Indoor Air Pollution

  • John D. Spengler

Abstract

Air pollution is a world problem afflicting densely populated urban centers and heavily industrialized areas. In recent years new data have changed our perception of air pollution. It is now recognized that air pollution crosses national boundaries to affect areas far distant from emission sources. In addition to its adverse health effects, air pollution also poses a danger to water, fish stocks, forests, natural vegetation, and agricultural crops. The evidence of pollutant transport across national boundaries now calls for increased international as well as national strategies for pollutant monitoring and control (46, 86).

Keywords

Volatile Organic Compound Nitrogen Oxide Total Suspend Particulate Nitrogen Dioxide Indoor Radon 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Recommended Readings

  1. American Thoracic Society: Environmental controls and lung disease. Am Rev Respir Dis 142:915, 1990.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • John D. Spengler

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