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Early Social Development in Autism

  • Catherine Lord
Chapter
Part of the Current Issues in Autism book series (CIAM)

Abstract

Social deficits may be the most long-lasting and handicapping aspects of autism (Park, 1986; Rumsey, Rapoport, & Sceery, 1985), but they are also the least well-documented in research. More encouraging, however, is that research on social deficits has increased significantly in the last 5 years, and, as it accumulates, we have had access to many vivid and remarkably similar clinical examples of the social difficulties of autistic people (Kanner, 1943; Wing, 1976). DSM-III-R, the diagnostic system in greatest current use in North America (American Psychiatric Association, 1987), in fact, consists of these examples supporting a very broad statement about a qualitative social deficit. However, to date, no comprehensive theory has been proposed that attempts to account for these examples over the course of development, although more specific accounts have been put forward (Frith, 1989; Hobson, in press).

Keywords

Facial Expression Developmental Disorder Joint Attention Child Psychology Child Psychiatry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Catherine Lord
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of ChicagoChicagoUSA

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