Modifiers of Herbicide Action at Target Sites

  • Kriton K. Hatzios
Part of the Topics in Applied Chemistry book series (TAPP)

Abstract

The spectrum of weed control afforded by most of the currently available herbicides is rather limited. Attempts to improve the performance of single herbicides by using herbicide mixtures date back to the early beginnings of the development of chemical weed control.1 Combinations of a graminicide and a broadleaf herbicide have been particularly successful and are recommended for use in most agronomic crops.2 More recently, many of the newer herbicides with high potency and a single target site (e.g., sulfonylureas and imididazolinones) are mixed with several old and cheap herbicides for broad-spectrum, season-long weed control.3,4

Keywords

Sorghum Oxime NADP Oxadiazoles Pantothenic Acid 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kriton K. Hatzios
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Plant Pathology, Physiology and Weed ScienceVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityBlacksburgUSA

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