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Separation Anxiety Disorder

  • Annette M. Farris
  • Ernest N. Jouriles
Part of the Critical Issues in Psychiatry book series (CIPS)

Abstract

This chapter highlights issues faced by mental health professionals who operate in psychiatric settings and deliver services to children exhibiting problems consistent with the diagnosis of separation anxiety disorder (SAD; American Psychiatric Association, 1980, 1987). In the first section of the chapter, diagnostic issues are briefly covered. In subsequent sections, prototypical behavioral assessment and treatment approaches are described, and the application of these practices within psychiatric settings is discussed.

Keywords

Anxiety Disorder Separation Anxiety Child Psychiatry Irrational Belief Physiological Arousal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Annette M. Farris
    • 1
  • Ernest N. Jouriles
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of HoustonHoustonUSA

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