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Assessment and Treatment of Panic Disorder and Agoraphobia

  • Michelle G. Craske
Part of the Critical Issues in Psychiatry book series (CIPS)

Abstract

In a medical-psychiatric setting, panic disorder and agoraphobia (PDA) may be either a primary reason for admission or an additional feature of other medical or psychiatric difficulties. A psychiatric hospital has particular relevance to the assessment and treatment of PDA: Because PDA is characterized by a fear of specific bodily sensations and the avoidance of being alone or without help, the setting itself may inadvertently reinforce agoraphobic fear and avoidance behavior. That is, the medical setting is a particularly “safe” environment for the panicker and/or agoraphobic because of the availability of medical care and support personnel and the protective-ness of the environment. Consequently, the medical setting may be (although, not necessarily) counterproductive to the treatment goals of learning to be less fearful and more independent.

Keywords

Anxiety Disorder Behavioral Treatment Personality Disorder Panic Disorder Panic Attack 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michelle G. Craske
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of California—Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA

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