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Professional Attitudes toward Parents

A Forty-Year Progress Report
  • Eric Schopler
  • Gary B. Mesibov
Part of the Current Issues in Autism book series (CIAM)

Abstract

Our understanding of autism, its causes and treatments, is still far from complete, although much has been learned about the syndrome Kanner first identified 40 years ago. There is no single aspect of our knowledge developed during this period that is more far-reaching and important to the effective and humane treatment of autistic people than the change in attitude toward their parents.

Keywords

Handicapped Child Professional Attitude Play Therapy Infantile Autism Childhood Schizophrenia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eric Schopler
    • 1
  • Gary B. Mesibov
    • 1
  1. 1.Division TEACCHUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA

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