Therapy Analogues and Clinical Trials in Psychotherapy Research

  • Alan E. Kazdin
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

The evaluation of psychotherapy continues to be a major topic in clinical psychology and psychiatry.1 Research is frequently designed to determine the efficacy of particular techniques, the relative effectiveness of alternative treatments, the combination of treatments that maximize change, and a variety of related questions (see Kazdin, 1980). Identification of effective psychotherapy techniques is a high priority for several reasons. First, estimates of the number of persons in the population at large who experience psychiatric dysfunction or problems of living and who might benefit from treatment have been as high as 15% to 25% (e.g., President’s Commission on Mental Health, 1978). Thus, the social, economic, and personal repercussions that mental health problems present are extensive (Kiesler, 1980). Although psychotherapy might not be expected to alleviate all mental health problems, certainly the availability of effective treatments would be of interest to a large body of consumers who might benefit directly.

Keywords

Placebo Obesity Depression Hunt Stein 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan E. Kazdin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry, Western Psychiatric Institute and ClinicUniversity of Pittsburgh School of MedicinePittsburghUSA

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