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Historical Overview

  • Michel Hersen
  • Larry Michelson
  • Alan S. Bellack
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

The objective of this introductory chapter is to provide a historical overview of the major theoretical, conceptual, and methodological issues and trends in psychotherapy research. The chapter is intended to illustrate the issues rather than detailing them exhaustively. However, the reader should find in-depth reviews of the substantive issues in the remaining chapters of the text. For purposes of this review, historical trends will be divided into three decades: 1950s, 1960s, and 1970s. Although these demarcations are admittedly artificial, they do provide boundaries that facilitate description and understanding of the issues in psychotherapy research over the past 30 years.

Keywords

Annual Review American Psychological Association Apply Behavior Analysis Social Skill Training Historical Overview 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michel Hersen
    • 1
  • Larry Michelson
    • 1
  • Alan S. Bellack
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry, Western Psychiatric Institute and ClinicUniversity of Pittsburgh School of MedicinePittsburghUSA
  2. 2.The Medical College of Pennsylvania at EPPIPhiladelphiaUSA

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