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Transnational Housing Policies

Common Problems and Solutions
  • Elizabeth D. Huttman
Part of the Human Behavior and Environment book series (HUBE, volume 8)

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the underlying social-psychological value orientations associated with housing policies in northern European countries, primarily Britain, West Germany, the Netherlands, Denmark, and Sweden, and the impact of changing government ideologies in a period of continued recession. Recession-related factors, including slowed growth and government deficits, are fostering a fiscal austerity philosophy and an increasing conservative orientation of so-called welfare state governments. Thus, governments are changing from long-term postwar Labor-Social Democrat party control to Conservative control in Britain and West Germany, to politically divided coalition rule in Denmark and the Netherlands, and to a more conservatively oriented Socialist rule in Sweden. Increasingly, conservative governmental value orientations are instrumental in reshaping housing policies, especially decreasing state subsidization of massive new housing construction.

Keywords

Social Housing Housing Policy Housing Stock Foreign Worker Rental Housing 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elizabeth D. Huttman
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Sociology and Social ServicesCalifornia State UniversityHaywardUSA

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