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Social Development

Recent Theoretical Trends and Relevance for Autism
  • Robert B. Cairns
Part of the Current Issues in Autism book series (CIAM)

Abstract

A reexamination of the social development of autistic children and adolescents from the perspective of general developmental theory potentially can yield benefits for both practice and theory. On the one hand, it may identify areas for innovation in treatment and education if one keeps an openness to fresh options. On the other hand, it can cast into relief shortcomings of theory that are subtle or overlooked if one is limited to normal social development. An informed approach to the matter calls for a critical appreciation of both the promise for the future and the pitfalls of the past.

Keywords

Social Development Autistic Disorder Social Adaptation Attachment Pattern Social Reciprocity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert B. Cairns
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA

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