Defining Black Families

Past and Present
  • Diane Scott-Jones
  • Sharon Nelson-Le Gall
Part of the Perspectives in Social Psychology book series (PSPS)

Abstract

Many changes are occurring in the families of our society. The rates of divorce and of single parenthood have increased dramatically in recent years. Roles within families are changing as the number of women in the workforce has increased. These changes in families have occurred as our society experienced great economic difficulty. As the attention of psychologists is given to new and evolving family forms and functions, it is important to reexamine black families, which have frequently been viewed as problematic. The purpose of this chapter is to discuss the ways in which black families have been defined and conceptualized in the past and present and to suggest alternative conceptualizations.

Keywords

Migration Income Assure Assimilation Stratification 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Diane Scott-Jones
    • 1
  • Sharon Nelson-Le Gall
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA

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