Penetration and Distribution of Insecticides

  • Gerald Thomas Brooks

Abstract

In order to exert its characteristic effects seen in vivo, a drug or toxicant must arrive at the site(s) of action [target(s)] in sufficient quantity for efficient interaction. If a method is available for measuring the interaction of a toxicant (insecticide) with the target itself on a molecular basis, then the potentially attainable toxicity (intrinsic toxicity) can be assessed, and such measurements provide important information about structure-activity relationships at the level of the site of action (Fig. 1). The development of anticholinesterase insecticides of the organophosphate and carbamate types provides some good examples of this approach, since intrinsic toxicities of candidate compounds are indicated by the extent to which they inhibit isolated preparations of insect acetylcholinesterase.

Keywords

Topical Application Nerve Cord Penetration Rate Methyl Parathion Penetration Curve 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerald Thomas Brooks
    • 1
  1. 1.Agricultural Research Council, Unit of Invertebrate Chemistry and PhysiologyUniversity of SussexBrightonEngland

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