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Event-Related Potentials in Cognitive Science

  • Marta Kutas
  • Steven A. Hillyard

Abstract

How is it that the physicochemical processes in the brain give rise to the phenomena of the mind? This transcendent question can be phrased in the jargon of several disciplines and addressed at many levels, with the choice often dictated by the experimental tools available. Investigators in various arms of the behavioral and neural sciences have for the most part forged ahead independently and found, at best, partial solutions to the problem. lt is becoming apparent that the enormity of the endeavor necessitates a liaison—if not a marriage—between disciplines.

Keywords

Speech Perception Secondary Task P300 Amplitude P300 Latency Clinical Neurophysiology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marta Kutas
    • 1
  • Steven A. Hillyard
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Neurosciences, School of MedicineUniversity of CaliforniaSan Diego, La JollaUSA

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