Crime and Marital Problems, and the Female Offender

  • Alexander B. Smith
  • Louis Berlin
Part of the Criminal Justice and Public Safety book series (CJPS)

Abstract

Corrections workers are aware of the widespread incidence of problems among offenders of either a marital or a family nature. The unmarried adult offender may exhibit conflicts with parents, siblings, or paramour. The married adult criminal may display problems regarding his mate, inadequacy in his role as a parent, pathological attachments to the extended family—in short, both marital and intrafamilial problems. One can say that the offender who has no family problems is a rarity indeed. Some theories of behavior place great emphasis on the family (which is the primary group) as the source and origin of both conforming and deviant behavior patterns. The corrections worker is ever mindful of the potential influence for good or evil that a wife or parents can exert on the offender. Hence, part of any rehabilitation treatment plan must involve spouse and family members.

Keywords

Depression Income Explosive Librium Sonal 

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Selected Readings

Crime and Marital Problems

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alexander B. Smith
    • 1
  • Louis Berlin
    • 2
  1. 1.John Jay College of Criminal JusticeCity University of New YorkNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Department of ProbationNew YorkUSA

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