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Reducing Aggression in Children through Social Interventions

  • Eric F. Dubow
  • Constance L. Cappas
Part of the Social Psychological Applications to Social Issues book series (SPAS, volume 1)

Abstract

Recent research has demonstrated that aggressive behavior develops early in life and is a relatively stable characteristic over time and across situations (Huesmann, Eron, Lefkowitz, & Walder, 1984; Olweus, 1979; Roff & Wirt, 1984). Huesmann et al. (1984) reported an impressive relation for males between peer-rated aggression in the third grade and aggression measured 22 years later by self-ratings of aggression, spouse abuse, and punishment of children, and by objective assessments (traffic violations and criminal offenses). An aggressive style of solving problems in childhood is related concurrently to other potentially handicapping problems, such as academic disability (Huesmann, Eron, & Yarmel, 1987) and peer rejection (Dubow & Cappas, 1988). Such evidence underscores the need to develop interventions to mitigate aggression in childhood before it becomes a deeply ingrained method of solving problems.

Keywords

Aggressive Behavior Prosocial Behavior Coercive Behavior Behavioral Rehearsal Clinical Child Psychology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eric F. Dubow
    • 1
  • Constance L. Cappas
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyBowling Green State UniversityBowling GreenUSA

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