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Hormonal Responses to the Stress of Exercise

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Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB,volume 245)

Abstract

Muscular activity is a component of the “fight or flight” response. Hormones which play an important role in the preservation of homeostasis are activated in response to acute exercise (1–9). Physical training appears to lead to a reduction in the “stress response” to a given workload (8,9). What role, this modulation of the “stress response” plays in the improved performance of trained athletes remains an intriguing question. We report in this brief review the response of several pituitary and adrenal hormones to various intensities of acute treadmill exercise stress. The effect of physical training on these hormonal responses was studied by comparing the responses of sedentary, untrained subjects to the responses of two groups of runners with different degrees of fitness (8).

Keywords

  • Anorexia Nervosa
  • Atrial Natriuretic Peptide
  • Treadmill Exercise
  • Plasma ACTH
  • Trained Subject

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© 1988 Springer Science+Business Media New York

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Luger, A., Deuster, P.A., Gold, P.W., Loriaux, D.L., Chrousos, G.P. (1988). Hormonal Responses to the Stress of Exercise. In: Chrousos, G.P., Loriaux, D.L., Gold, P.W. (eds) Mechanisms of Physical and Emotional Stress. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, vol 245. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4899-2064-5_22

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4899-2064-5_22

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