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CSAT Antibody Interferes with in Vivo Migration of Somitic Myoblast Precursors into the Body Wall

  • T. Jaffredo
  • A. F. Horwitz
  • C. A. Buck
  • P. M. Rong
  • F. Dieterlen-Lièvre
Chapter
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 118)

Abstract

An involvement of the fibronectin receptor in muscle cell behavior has been demonstrated previously only in vitro (Chiquet et al., 1979; Neff et al., 1982; Greve and Gottlieb, 1982; Turner et al., 1983). By grafting mouse hybridoma cells in the early chick embryo in a manner similar to that used by Bronner-Fraser to study neural crest cell migration (Bronner-Fraser, 1985), we now provide in vivo evidence that the disturbance of FN-cell interactions disrupt the migration of myoblasts.

Keywords

Neural Crest Chick Embryo Body Wall Abdominal Muscle Myogenic Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Jaffredo
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • A. F. Horwitz
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • C. A. Buck
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • P. M. Rong
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • F. Dieterlen-Lièvre
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Institut d’EmbryologieNogent-sur-MarneFrance
  2. 2.University of Pennsylvania School of MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA
  3. 3.The Wistar InstitutePhiladelphiaUSA

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