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Atomic Many Body Theory of Giant Resonances

  • Hugh P. Kelly
  • Zikri Altun
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSB, volume 151)

Abstract

During the past decade there has been great interest in the subject of photoionization, both by experimenters1 and by theorists.2, 3 Much of the interest has centered on the large resonance structures which are observed in many cross sections. In particular, the rare gases show evidence of broad resonance-like structures, both for the outer (np)6 subshells and also for the inner (4d)10 subshell in the case of xenon. Similar structure has been also observed in other atoms with large filled subshells such as the 4d10 subshell in atomic barium which has been studied extensively.4–13 It is now generally believed2 that calculations of these cross sections by different theoretical methods which take electron correlations into account give good agreement with experiment. However, a very recent photoemission experiment by Becker et al.14 for the 4d10 subshell of xenon indicates that the many-body calculations are not in close agreement with the photoemission results but are in reasonable agreement with the experimental results for total absorption which includes multiple excitations, i. e., satellite structure. Preliminary photoemission results15 for 4d10 subshell of barium also indicate a similar situation. It is important for our understanding of the photoionization process that we be able to calculate accurately such cross sections as those for the 4d10 subshells of xenon and barium.

Keywords

Photoionization Cross Section Giant Resonance Partial Cross Section Calculated Resonance Ground State Correlation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hugh P. Kelly
    • 1
  • Zikri Altun
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysicsUniversity of VirginiaCharlottesvilleUSA

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