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Neurochemical Hypotheses of Childhood Psychoses

  • Glen R. Elliott
  • Roland D. Ciaranello
Part of the Current Issues in Autism book series (CIAM)

Abstract

Childhood psychoses are a diverse group of poorly understood disorders that first may become manifest from birth through adolescence. Often, they incapacitate those afflicted for life. Concepts about the etiolgies of childhood psychoses have evolved a great deal over the past decade, and a chapter exploring possible roles of brain neuroregulators no longer requires the justification it once did. Even so, the title of this chapter is somewhat misleading, because as yet no specific hypotheses implicate an abnormality in a single neuroregulatory system as the underlying mechanism for childhood psychoses. Rather, as described in the following pages, investigators have been accumulating data on (1) how disruptions in certain aspects of normal development and metabolism can result in psychotic syndromes in childhood and (2) whether the activity of some known neuroregulators are altered in children with psychoses. Such research provides fundamental building blocks for clarifying the causes of these devastating disorders.

Keywords

Autistic Child Magnetic Resonance Signal Gilles Dela Tourette Syndrome Infantile Autism Blood Serotonin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Glen R. Elliott
    • 1
  • Roland D. Ciaranello
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Child Psychiatry and Child Development, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesStanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA

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