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Assessment of Spatial Abilities

  • Bruce M. Caplan
  • Sarah Romans
Part of the Human Brain Function book series (HBFA)

Abstract

Analyzing and understanding spatial ability is a complex enterprise. By way of illustration, consider the following daily life activities that contain a spatial aspect: parallel parking an automobile, rearranging living room furniture, reading a blueprint, giving directions to a lost traveler, deciphering the instructions that accompany an item that “requires some assembly,” and fitting into the trunk of a car one more suitcase than the trunk was meant to hold. Consider further a professional quarterback about to release a forward pass who (in addition to maintaining spatial awareness of oncoming defensive linemen) must also gauge the speed and path of his intended receiver in order to aim the football so that it will arrive at its intended location at the same time as his teammate. These functions clearly do not lend themselves to precise laboratory measurement. Furthermore, performance is determined not only by whatever spatial skills are relevant, but also by other functions such as language, motor, and planning abilities.

Keywords

Left Hemisphere Mental Rotation Spatial Ability Trail Make Test Clinical Neuropsychology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bruce M. Caplan
    • 1
  • Sarah Romans
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Rehabilitation MedicineThomas Jefferson University HospitalPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Drexel UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA

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