Emotion and the Possibility of Psychologists Entering into Heaven

  • Terrance Brown
  • Arnold Kozak
Part of the Emotions, Personality, and Psychotherapy book series (EPPS)

Abstract

Since Babel, the idea of constructing a tower of stones as a means of entering into heaven has given way to the idea of constructing a tower of understanding. Philosophers since the ancient Greeks and psychologists for at least 100 years have tried to reach the paradise of everlasting epistemological bliss by unlocking the secrets of the mind. In that struggle and despite the vicissitudes of psychological fashion, the study of emotion has played an essential, if not always explicit, role. In virtually every text we have examined, emotion is assumed, mistakenly and unscientifically, to be a term that is mutually understood (cf. Quine, 1960) or, attempting to foil the gods much space is devoted to the problem of definition. That is where our story starts.

Keywords

Depression Serotonin Retina Coherence Norepinephrine 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Terrance Brown
    • 1
  • Arnold Kozak
    • 2
  1. 1.ChicagoUSA
  2. 2.CambridgeUSA

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