Advertisement

Job Modification/Accommodation and Assistive Technology

Chapter
Part of the Springer Series in Rehabilitation and Health book series (SSRH)

Abstract

Job modification, accommodation, and assistive technology interventions (JMAATIs) subscribe to preventative ergonomic principles and acknowledge the need for worker training. They concentrate on individualizing workstations and work environments to create a custom match between a job and a worker.

Keywords

Assistive Technology Cognitive Enhancement Functional Capacity Evaluation Screen Reader Computer Workstation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Angelo, J., & Smith, R. O. (1989). The critical role of occupational therapy in augmentative communication services. In Technology Review’ 89 (pp. 49–54). Rockville, MD: American Occupational Therapy Association.Google Scholar
  2. Chapanis, A. (1976). Engineering psychology. In M. D. Dunnette (Ed.), Handbook of industrial and organizational psychology. Chicago: Rand McNally.Google Scholar
  3. Christiansen, C. (1991). Occupational therapy: Intervention for life performance. In C. Christiansen & C. Baum (Eds.), Occupational therapy: Overcoming human performance deficits (pp. 2–43). Thorofare, NJ: Slack Publishers.Google Scholar
  4. Cook, M., & Hussey, S. M. (1995). Assistive technologies: Principles and practice. St. Louis, MO: Mosby.Google Scholar
  5. Eastman Kodak Company. (1983). Ergonomic design for people at work (Vol. 1). New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold.Google Scholar
  6. Grandjean, E. (1985). Fitting the task to the man: An ergonomic approach. Philadelphia, PA: Taylor Francis.Google Scholar
  7. Grant, J., Kozole, K., Sax, C., Smaby, N., & Tung, D. (1994). The successful integration of assistive technology and job development for an individual with a disability: A case study. Proceedings of the RESNA 1994 Annual Conference, 492-494.Google Scholar
  8. Gunderson, J., & Mendelson, R. (1997). Usability of World Wide Web browsers by persons with visual impairments. Proceedings of the RESNA 1997 Annual Conference, 330-332.Google Scholar
  9. Hermenau, D. C. (1995). Seating. In K. Jacobs & C. M. Bettencourt (Eds.), Ergonomics for therapists (pp. 137–155). Boston, MA: Butterworth-Heinemann.Google Scholar
  10. Huffman, D. L, & Loy, B. A. (1997). Effects of split keyboard use on cumulative trauma disorders. Proceedings of the RESNA 1997 Annual Conference, 431-433.Google Scholar
  11. Job Accommodation Network (JAN) (1991). West Virginia University. P.O. Box 6080, Morgantown, WV 26506-6080.Google Scholar
  12. Lown, N. F. (1997). Employers who hire assistive technology users: A case study. Proceedings of the RESNA 1997 Annual Conference, 17-19.Google Scholar
  13. Mallik, K., & Stinson, D. (1994). Business and rehabilitation: A partnership of worksite accommodation. Proceedings of the RESNA 1994 Annual Conference, 486.Google Scholar
  14. McCormick, E. J., & Sanders, M. S. (1982). Human factors in engineering and design. New York: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
  15. Rodgers, B. L. (1985). A future perspective on the holistic use of technology for people with disabilities. Madison, WI: Trace R&D Center.Google Scholar
  16. Smith, M. J., & Sainfort, P. C. (1989). A balance theory of job design for stress reduction. International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics, 4, 67–79.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Smith, R. O. (1991). Technological approaches to performance enhancement. In C. Christiansen & C. Baum (Eds.), Occupational therapy: Overcoming human performance deficits (pp. 746–786). Thorofare, NJ: Slack Publishers.Google Scholar
  18. Smith, R. O., Benge, M., & Hall, M. (1994). Technology for self-care. In C. Christiansen (Ed.), Ways of living: Self-care management for people with special needs (pp. 379–422). Rockville, MD: American Occupational Therapy Association.Google Scholar
  19. Technology-Related Assistance for Individuals with Disabilities Act of 1988, Public Law No. 100-407, 29 U.S.C.A. 2201 et seq.Google Scholar
  20. Vanderheiden, G. C. (1990). Thirty-something million: Should they be exceptions? Human Factors, 32, 383–396.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Classical Texts Covering the Assisuve Technology Field

  1. Angelo, J. (1997). Assistive technology for rehabilitation therapists. Philadelphia, PA: F. A. Davis.Google Scholar
  2. Charlebois-Marois, C. (1985). Everybody’s technology: A sharing of ideas in augmentative communication. Montreal, Canada: Charlecom.Google Scholar
  3. Church, G., & Glennen, S. (1992). The handbook of assistive technology. San Diego, CA: Singular Press.Google Scholar
  4. Cook, M., & Hussey, S. M. (1995). Assistive technologies: Principles and practice. St. Louis, MO: Mosby.Google Scholar
  5. Cromwell, F. S. (Ed.). (1986). Computer applications in occupational therapy. New York: Haworth Press.Google Scholar
  6. Enders, A. (1990). Assistive technology sourcebook. Arlington, VA: RESNA.Google Scholar
  7. Flippo, K. E., Inge, K. J., & Barcus, J. M. (1995). Assistive technology: A resource for school, work, and community. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing.Google Scholar
  8. Hedman, G. (1990). Rehabilitation technology. Binghamton, NY: Haworth Press.Google Scholar
  9. Lane, J. P., & Mann, W. C. (1991). Assistive technology for persons with disabilities: The role of occupational therapy. Rockville, MD: American Occupational Therapy Association.Google Scholar
  10. Leslie, J. H., & Smith, R. V. (1990). Rehabilitation engineering. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press.Google Scholar
  11. Webster, J. G., Cook, A. M., Tompkins, W. J., & Vanderheiden, G. C. (1985). Electronic devices for rehabilitation. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Occupational Therapy ProgramUniversity of Wisconsin-MilwaukeeMilwaukeeUSA
  2. 2.Zerrecon Inc.MilwaukeeUSA

Personalised recommendations