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Interconnected systems

  • Roy Billinton
  • Ronald N. Allan
Chapter
  • 958 Downloads

Abstract

The adequacy of the generating capacity in a power system is normally improved by interconnecting the system to another power system [1]. Each interconnected system can then operate at a given risk level with a lower reserve than would be required without the interconnection [2]. This condition is brought about by the diversity in the probabilistic occurrence of load and capacity outages in the different systems [3]. The actual interconnection benefits depend on the installed capacity in each system, the total tie capacity, the forced outage rates of the tie lines, the load levels and their residual uncertainties in each system and the type of agreement in existence between the systems [4].

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roy Billinton
    • 1
  • Ronald N. Allan
    • 2
  1. 1.College of EngineeringUniversity of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada
  2. 2.Institute of Science and TechnologyUniversity of ManchesterManchesterEngland

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