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Reconstructing Huari

A Cultural Chronology for the Capital City
  • William H. Isbell
Part of the Fundamental Issues in Archaeology book series (FIAR)

Abstract

During the sixth through ninth centuries, a distinctive ceramic style and iconography were spread through much of Peru. Archaeological research clearly shows the center of dispersal to have been the site of Huari (Menzel 1964, 1968, 1977; Knobloch 1991). During these same centuries it is also clear that Huari became one of the largest cities of the precolumbian Andes (Isbell 1978, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986; Isbell, Brewster-Wray and Spickard 1991; Rowe 1963). Furthermore, centers with Huari style architecture appeared intrusively in distant parts of the Peruvian highlands—probably the first prehistoric Andean evidence for provincial administrative centers (Isbell 1977, 1989, 1991a, 1991b; Isbell and Schreiber 1978; Lumbreras 1974; McEwan 1984, 1991; Rowe 1956, 1963; Schreiber 1978, 1987a, 1987b, 1991, 1992; J. Topic 1991; Topic and Topic 1985a). Finally, at least one Huari fortress has been identified, ensconced deep inside Tiahuanaco territory (Watanabe 1984; Moseley, Feldman, Goldstein, and Watanabe 1991). I know of no comparable evidence for military conquest and occupation of enemy land at an earlier date in the Andes.

Keywords

Radiocarbon Date American Antiquity Shaped Building Middle Horizon Military Elite 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • William H. Isbell
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyState University of New York at BinghamtonBinghamtonUSA

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