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Effects of Linoleic Acid Supplements on Atopic Dermatitis

  • Ana Giménez-Arnau
  • Carlos Barranco
  • Margarita Alberola
  • Cathy Wale
  • Sergio Serrano
  • Michael R. Buchanan
  • José G. Camarasa
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 433)

Abstract

Atopy is primarily a condition of hypersensitivity. Atopic disease include atopic eczema, allergic bronchial asthma or hay fever. Atopic dermatitis signs and symptoms are dry itching skin, and eczematous inflammation. Pathophysiology involve: genetics, trigger factors as aeroallergens, superantigens or stress, Th2 lymphocyte cytokine profile (Interleukin (IL)-4,-5,-10) dominance, hyper IgE, monocyte phosphodiesterase increased activity, impaired epidermal barrier function and abnormal linoleic acid metabolism.

Keywords

Atopic Dermatitis Atopic Disease Highly Unsaturated Fatty Acid Essential Fatty Acid Deficiency Severe Atopic Dermatitis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ana Giménez-Arnau
    • 1
  • Carlos Barranco
    • 2
  • Margarita Alberola
    • 2
  • Cathy Wale
    • 3
  • Sergio Serrano
    • 2
  • Michael R. Buchanan
    • 3
  • José G. Camarasa
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Dermatology. Hospital del Mar, IMIMUniversitat Autònoma de BarcelonaSpain
  2. 2.Department of Pathology. Hospital del Mar, IMIM.Universitat Autònoma de BarcelonaSpain
  3. 3.Department of PathologyMacMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada

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