Advertisement

Demographic Change and Health Behavior

  • Louis G. Pol
  • Richard K. Thomas

Abstract

Demographic change has been a major contributor to altered patterns of health services demand, health services supply, health status, and health behavior throughout the history of modern medicine; nevertheless, the implications of current patterns of demographic change for health behavior are not as yet clearly understood. Researchers in general have focused on the most basic relationships between demographics and health care, often overlooking the more subtle and indirect implications of these connections. Moreover, little attention has been paid to the dynamics of demographic change, which often occurs over a very short period of time.

Keywords

Health Behavior Demographic Change Population Projection Dental Visit United States Population 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Ahlburg, D. A. (1993). The census bureau’s new projections of the U.S. population. Population and Development Review, 19(1), 159–174.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Ahlburg, D., & Vaupel, J. (1990). Alternative projections of the U.S. population. Demography, 27(4), 639–652.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Austoker, J. (1994). Cancer prevention: Setting the scene. British Medical Journal, 308(May), 1415–1420.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Backett, K. C., & Davison, C. (1995). Lifecourse and lifestyle: The social and cultural location of health behaviours. Social Science and Medicine, 40(5), 629–638.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Bean, A., & Talaga, J. (1991). Appointment breaking: Causes and solutions. Journal of Health Care Marketing, 12(4), 14–25.Google Scholar
  6. Bloom, B., Gift, H. C., & Jack, S. S. (1992). Dental services and oral health: United States, 1989. Vital and health statistics, Series 10, No. 183. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics.Google Scholar
  7. Braus, P. (1994). Nursing homes: The hard facts. American Demographics, 16(3), 46–47.Google Scholar
  8. Campbell, P.C. (1994). Population projections for states, by age, sex, race and Hispanic origin: 1993 to 2050. Current population reports, Series P-25, No. 1111. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.Google Scholar
  9. Crimmins, E. M., Hayward, M. D., & Saito, Y. (1994). Changing mortality and morbidity rates and the health status and life expectancy of the older population. Demography, 31(1), 159–175.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. DaVanzo, J., & Rahman, O. (1993). American families: Trends and correlates. Population Index, 590), 350-386.Google Scholar
  11. Day, J. C. (1992). Population projections of the United States, by age, race and Hispanic origin: 1992–2050. Current population reports, Series P-25, No. 1092. Washington, DC: U. S. Government Printing Office.Google Scholar
  12. Day, J. C. (1993). Population projections of the United States, by age, race and Hispanic origin: 1993–2050. Current population reports, Series P-25, No. 1104. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.Google Scholar
  13. Easterlin, R. (1968). Population, labor force and long swings in economic growth. New York: National Bureau of Economic Research.Google Scholar
  14. Easterlin, R. (1976). What will 1984 be like? Socioeconomic implications of recent twists in age structure. Demography, 15(4), 397–432.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. EURO Report Studies. (1988). Comprehensive cardiovascular community control programmes in Europe, 106, 1–91.Google Scholar
  16. Herbig, P., & Koehler, W (1993). Implications of the baby bust generation upon the health care market. Health Marketing Quarterly, 100(3/4), 23–29.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Manton, K., Corder, L. S., & Stallard, E. (1993). Estimates of change in chronic disability and institutional incidence and prevalence rates in the U.S. elderly population from the 1982, 1984 and 1989 National Long Term Care Survey. Journal of Gerontology, 48(5), 170–182.Google Scholar
  18. McDaniel, C., Gates, R., & Lamb, C. (1992). Who leaves the service area? Profiling the hospital outshopper. Journal of Health Care Marketing, 12(3), 2–9.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  19. O’Reilly, O., & Shelley, E. (1991). The Kilkenny post-primary schools survey: A survey of knowledge, attitudes and behaviour relevant to non-communicable diseases. Irish Journal of Medical Science, 160(Supplement 9), 40–44.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Piha, T., Besselink, E., & Lopez, A. D. (1993). Tobacco or health. World health statistics. Copenhagen: WHO Regional Office for Europe.Google Scholar
  21. Pill, R., Peters, T. J., & Robling, M. R. (1995). Social class and preventive health behaviour: A British example. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 49(1), 28–32.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Pol, L. G., & Thomas, R. K. (1992). The demography of health and health care. New York: Plenum Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Pollard, K. M. (1994). Population stabilization no longer in sight for U. S. Population Today, 22(5). Washington, DC: Population Reference Bureau.Google Scholar
  24. Schoenborn, A., & Schoenborn, C. A. (1993). Health promotion and disease prevention: United States, 1990. Vital and health statistics, Series 10, No. 185. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics.Google Scholar
  25. Sherer, J. (1993). Age wave. Hospitals and Health Networks, 67(15), 40, 54.Google Scholar
  26. Steptoe, A., & Wardle, J. (1992). Cognitive predictors of health behaviour in contrasting regions of Europe. British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 31(4), 485–502.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Thomas, R. K. (1993). Health care consumers in the 1990s. Ithaca, NY: American Demographic Books.Google Scholar
  28. Thomas, R. K., & Pol, L. G. (1993). Health demography comes of age. Health Marketing Quarterly, 10(3/4), 67–82.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Thomas, R. K., & Sehnert, W. F. (1989). The dual health care market. American Demographics, 11(April), 46–47.Google Scholar
  30. Umberson, D. (1987). Family status and health behaviors: Social control as a dimension of social integration. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 30(September), 306–319.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. U. S. Bureau of the Census. (1993). Statistical abstract of the United States, 1993. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.Google Scholar
  32. U.S. Bureau of Census. (1994). Statistical abstract of the United States, 1994, Table 209. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.Google Scholar
  33. Verbrugge, L. M. (1989). The twain meet: Empirical evidence of sex differences in health and mortality. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 30(September), 282–304.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Visser, A. P. (1993). Patient education in health psychology: A pan-European perspective. Patient Education Counselor, 22(3), 115.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Wardle, J., & Steptoe, A. (1991). The European health and behaviour survey: Rationale, methods, and initial results from the United Kingdom. Social Science and Medicine, 33(8), 925–36.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Louis G. Pol
    • 1
  • Richard K. Thomas
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of MarketingUniversity of Nebraska at OmahaOmahaUSA
  2. 2.Medical Services Research GroupMemphisUSA

Personalised recommendations