Fatigue pp 353-375 | Cite as

Life Prediction for Turbine Engine Components

  • T. Nicholas
  • J. M. Larsen
Part of the Sagamore Army Materials Research Conference Proceedings book series (SAMC, volume 27)

Abstract

An alternate approach to life management of turbine engines is being considered by the U.S. Air Force. Whereas most major structural components are currently limited by low cycle fatigue and are retired from service after their design life has been reached, a “Retirement for Cause” approach would keep components in service until a fatigue crack has been detected. The approach is based on non-destructive inspection and prediction of fatigue crack growth behavior under engine operating conditions. This paper discusses the concept of retirement for cause and reviews the problems associated with the prediction of crack growth. Several aspects of crack growth under engine spectrum loading including creep crack growth and crack retardation are discussed. Recommendations for future research efforts are presented.

Keywords

Combustion Fatigue Assure Flange Riser 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Nicholas
    • 1
  • J. M. Larsen
    • 1
  1. 1.Air Force Wright Aeronautical LaboratoriesAFWAL/MLLNWright-Patterson AFBUSA

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