A Developmental Psychopathology Perspective on Depression in Children and Adolescents

  • Dante Cicchetti
  • Fred A. Rogosch
  • Sheree L. Toth
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Abstract

The study of depression in children and adolescents has gone through a series of contradictory formulations as theorists have attempted to understand this complex form of disorder in youngsters. Conceptualizations have ranged from the belief that depression in children was impossible due to the immaturity of ego development prior to adolescence and the concomitant inability to experience guilt (Rie, 1966) to the belief that depression in children is prevalent and may be manifested in a variety of symptoms quite divergent from those evidenced in adulthood, i. e., depressive equivalents (Cytryn & McKnew, 1972; Glaser, 1967) to the assertion that symptoms indicating depression are the same across the age span from childhood to adulthood (American Psychiatric Association, 1987; Kashani et al., 1981; Puig-Antich, 1980). Such divergence in thinking indicates that the topic of depression in childhood and adolescence is an area of active and significant theoretical and empirical inquiry.

Keywords

Depression Income Schizophrenia Germinal Coherence 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dante Cicchetti
    • 1
  • Fred A. Rogosch
    • 1
  • Sheree L. Toth
    • 1
  1. 1.Mt. Hope Family CenterUniversity of RochesterRochesterUSA

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