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Multiple Personality Disorder

  • Philip M. Coons

Abstract

Multiple personality disorder (MPD), which has been described elsewhere (Coons, Bowman, & Milstein, 1988; Kluft, 1991b; Putnam, 1989; Putnam, Guroff, Silberman, Barban, & Post, 1986; Ross, 1989), is a polysymptomatic disorder which most often presents in women who report histories of long-standing and severe physical and sexual abuse beginning in early childhood. Depression most commonly overlies the more subtle dissociative symptomatology. Loewenstein (1991a) best articulated the polysymptomatic nature of MPD by dividing the syndrome into symptom clusters, including process, amnesic, autohypnotic, posttraumatic, somatoform, and affective symptoms. The dissociative symptoms will be described first, even though they are more subtle and have prompted one expert to call for a radical change in the way MPD is diagnosed (Nakdimen, 1992).

Keywords

Ptsd Symptom Borderline Personality Disorder Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory Personality State Psychiatric Clinic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Philip M. Coons
    • 1
  1. 1.Larue D. Carter Memorial HospitalIndiana UniversityIndianapolisUSA

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